Evolution in Species May Reverse Predator-Prey Population Cycles

May 5, 2014 -- According to a study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, co-evolutionary changes in species may reverse traditional predator-prey population cycles, creating the appearance that prey are eating the predators.

Graphene is Only as Strong as its Weakest Link: Experiments Determine Real-world Limits of Two-dimensional Carbon

April 29, 2014 -- Research laboratories at Rice University and Georgia Tech have tested the fracture toughness of graphene for the first time by making and measuring "pre-cracks" under stress.

Researchers Convert Basic Discoveries in Materials Science and Engineering to Real-World Applications

Research Horizons Winter-Spring 2014 -- Materials research is a major priority at Georgia Tech that involves some 200 faculty members. Major research areas include materials for electronics, infrastructure, energy, environment, transportation, biotechnology, aerospace and defense.

Cosmic Slurp: Researchers Predict Signs of Black Holes Swallowing Stars

April 17, 2014 -- Using a mix of theoretical and computer-based approaches, researchers are trying to predict the dynamics of events such as black holes devouring stars, a scenario also known as a "tidal disruption."

Neuromorphic Computing “Roadmap” Envisions Analog Path to Simulating Human Brain

April 16, 2014 -- Electrical engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology recently published a "roadmap" that details innovative analog-based techniques that could make it possible to build a practical neuromorphic computer that mimics the brain's operation.

Fish From Acidic Ocean Waters Less Able to Smell Predators

April 14, 2014 - Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor were less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.

Researchers Determine How Mechanical Forces Affect T-Cell Recognition and Signalling

April 10, 2014 -- Researchers have developed a new understanding of the T-cell recognition process by describing how T-cell receptors use mechanical contact – the forces involved in their binding to antigens – to make decisions about whether or not the cells they encounter are threats.

Seeing Double: New Study Explains Evolution of Duplicate Genes

April 7, 2013 - From time to time, living cells will accidentally make an extra copy of a gene during the normal replication process. Throughout the history of life, evolution has molded some of these seemingly superfluous genes into a source of genetic novelty, adaptation and diversity. A new study shows one way that some duplicate genes could have long-ago escaped elimination from the genome, leading to the genetic innovation seen in modern life.

Self-Assembled Silver Superlattices Create Molecular Machines with Hydrogen-Bond “Hinges” and Moving “Gears”

April 6, 2014 -- A combined computational and experimental study of self-assembled silver-based structures known as superlattices has revealed an unusual and unexpected behavior: arrays of gear-like molecular-scale machines that rotate in unison when pressure is applied to them.

Heat-Conducting Polymer Cools Hot Electronic Devices at 200 Degrees C

March 30, 2014 -- By harnessing an electropolymerization process to produce aligned arrays of polymer nanofibers, researchers have developed a thermal interface material able to conduct heat 20 times better than the original polymer -- operating at temperatures of up to 200 degrees Celsius.