Archive for the ‘Electronics & Nanotechnology’ Category

Agile Aperture Antenna Tested on Aircraft to Survey Ground Emitters, Maintain Satellite Connection

July 9, 2014 -- The Georgia Tech Research Institute’s software-defined, electronically-reconfigurable Agile Aperture Antenna (A3) has now been tested on the land, sea and air. Department of Defense representatives were in attendance during a recent event where two of the low-power devices, which can change beam directions in a thousandth of a second, were demonstrated in an aircraft during flight tests.

Graphene is Only as Strong as its Weakest Link: Experiments Determine Real-world Limits of Two-dimensional Carbon

April 29, 2014 -- Research laboratories at Rice University and Georgia Tech have tested the fracture toughness of graphene for the first time by making and measuring "pre-cracks" under stress.

Neuromorphic Computing “Roadmap” Envisions Analog Path to Simulating Human Brain

April 16, 2014 -- Electrical engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology recently published a "roadmap" that details innovative analog-based techniques that could make it possible to build a practical neuromorphic computer that mimics the brain's operation.

Self-Assembled Silver Superlattices Create Molecular Machines with Hydrogen-Bond “Hinges” and Moving “Gears”

April 6, 2014 -- A combined computational and experimental study of self-assembled silver-based structures known as superlattices has revealed an unusual and unexpected behavior: arrays of gear-like molecular-scale machines that rotate in unison when pressure is applied to them.

Heat-Conducting Polymer Cools Hot Electronic Devices at 200 Degrees C

March 30, 2014 -- By harnessing an electropolymerization process to produce aligned arrays of polymer nanofibers, researchers have developed a thermal interface material able to conduct heat 20 times better than the original polymer -- operating at temperatures of up to 200 degrees Celsius.

Biomolecular Tweezers Facilitate Study of Mechanical Force Effects on Cells and Proteins

March 10, 2014 -- A new type of biomolecular tweezers could help researchers study how mechanical forces affect the biochemical activity of cells and proteins. The devices – too small to see without a microscope – use opposing magnetic and electrophoretic forces to precisely stretch the cells and molecules.

Single Chip Device to Provide Real-Time 3-D Images from Inside the Heart and Blood Vessels

February 18, 2014 -- Researchers have developed the technology for a catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, three-dimensional imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels. With its volumetric imaging, the new device could better guide surgeons working in the heart.

Silicon-Germanium Chip Sets New Speed Record

February 18, 2014 -- A research collaboration has demonstrated the world's fastest silicon-based device to date. The investigators operated a silicon-germanium (SiGe) transistor at 798 gigahertz (GHz) fMAX, exceeding the previous speed record for silicon-germanium chips by about 200 GHz.

Ballistic Transport in Graphene Suggests New Type of Electronic Device

February 5, 2014 -- Using electrons more like photons could provide the foundation for a new type of electronic device that would capitalize on the ability of graphene to carry electrons with almost no resistance even at room temperature – a property known as ballistic transport.

New Solar Car Concept Shines at Electronics, Cars Shows

January 15, 2014 - Ford Motor Company, in collaboration with Georgia Tech, debuted a new solar car concept earlier this month at the 2014 International CES in Las Vegas. The car is continuing its media tour this week at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.