Archive for the ‘Biotechnology & Biomedicine’ Category

Improved Telemedicine System Connects Doctors to Autism Patients in Rural Georgia

July 21, 2014 - A recently improved telemedicine system was optimized by scientists at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) and Cisco Systems, Inc. The system at Marcus Autism Center’s telemedicine room is now a showcase for providers of telemedicine, where improved video capabilities and an ergonomic suite allow patients in rural Georgia to meet face-to-face with medical specialists in Atlanta.

Evolution of Life’s Operating System Revealed in Detail

June 30, 2014 - The evolution of the ribosome, a large molecular structure found in the cells of all species, has been revealed in unprecedented detail in a new study.

Stanley Miller’s Forgotten Experiments, Analyzed

June 25, 2014 - Stanley Miller, the chemist whose landmark experiment published in 1953 showed how some of the molecules of life could have formed on a young Earth, left behind boxes of experimental samples that he never analyzed. The first-ever analysis of some of Miller’s old samples has revealed another way that important molecules could have formed on early Earth.

Gene Expression Signature Identifies Patients at Higher Risk for Cardiovascular Death

May 29, 2014 -- A study of 338 patients with coronary artery disease has identified a gene expression profile associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular death. Used with other indicators such as biochemical markers and family history, the profile – based on a simple blood test – may help identify patients who could benefit from personalized treatment and counseling designed to address risk factors.

Engineering a Better Way to Rebuild Bone Inside the Body

May 29, 2014 - A new technology under development at the Georgia Institute of Technology could one day provide more efficient delivery of the bone regenerating growth factors with greater accuracy and at a lower cost.

Ovarian Cancer Cells Are More Aggressive On Soft Tissues

May 8, 2014 - When ovarian cancer spreads from the ovaries it almost always does so to a layer of fatty tissue that lines the gut. A new study has found that ovarian cancer cells are more aggressive on these soft tissues due to the mechanical properties of this environment. The finding is contrary to what is seen with other malignant cancer cells that seem to prefer stiffer tissues.

Evolution in Species May Reverse Predator-Prey Population Cycles

May 5, 2014 -- According to a study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, co-evolutionary changes in species may reverse traditional predator-prey population cycles, creating the appearance that prey are eating the predators.

Researchers Determine How Mechanical Forces Affect T-Cell Recognition and Signalling

April 10, 2014 -- Researchers have developed a new understanding of the T-cell recognition process by describing how T-cell receptors use mechanical contact – the forces involved in their binding to antigens – to make decisions about whether or not the cells they encounter are threats.

Seeing Double: New Study Explains Evolution of Duplicate Genes

April 7, 2013 - From time to time, living cells will accidentally make an extra copy of a gene during the normal replication process. Throughout the history of life, evolution has molded some of these seemingly superfluous genes into a source of genetic novelty, adaptation and diversity. A new study shows one way that some duplicate genes could have long-ago escaped elimination from the genome, leading to the genetic innovation seen in modern life.

Engineered Bacteria Produce Biofuel Alternative for High-Energy Rocket Fuel

March 26, 2014 -- Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Joint BioEnergy Institute have engineered a bacterium to synthesize pinene, a hydrocarbon produced by trees that could potentially replace high-energy fuels, such as JP-10, in missiles and other aerospace applications.